Remember to be.

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“If I return it will be on two wheels or four”

I’m guessing the man was hovering around 50 years old; he had a great rural accent, a clean shave, white tennis shoes and slacks.

I’m not sure that I have ever sat next to a person on their first airplane ride.

Could have happened in the early days before ubiquitous air travel, back when it was amazing that people other than the highly affluent had access to faster than car transportation. If I did, I don’t remember because I was new too.

“Are you ok sir?”

“I’m ok…Can I have a water?”

“I’ll get you one when we are at cruising altitude”

I never caught his name. His row 28 seat C small talk hadn’t been developed through years of passing cups and pushing past for a pee break. Before we took off, the steward asked him an additional time if he was ok. We were in an exit row, but I used that as a catalyst to conversation, we had 3.4 hours together almost touching facing the same direction towards the west coast, might as well be polite.

[Plus people are far more amendable to let you to the bathroom if you have started your knowing each other before asking for a favor.]

He was traveling to meet his brother who worked at a shipyard in Long Beach. He was coming to help him on his house and if he liked it, then stay. No return trip booked but he was sure that if it came time to return he would buy a car or a motorcycle and never get on an airplane again. 

The flight was taking off, he had his eyes closed and gripping the hand rests, hard.

How often are you present for seminal moments in people’s lives?

I got to tell him when the worst of it was over and then when the captain turned on the seatbelt sign later that it meant there may be turbulence.

It was that feeling of helping an old lady across the street or helping a child reach something on a high shelf or telling a stranger they dropped something of value.

I had a value to another person of real tangible use, knowledge. In this case it was used to assuage fears and to show camaraderie in the face of questionable physics.

[A steel tube flying through the air does seem suspect if you think about it.]

 

 

If feels good to be reminded of the human experience of existing. I find that so often I am stuck in a world of cerebral planning or creating similitudes between previous experiences. I don’t register new or present moments often; it’s nice to be reminded of “new”.

 

 

 

 

Opening at the Asheville art Museum

I had the honor to be in my home town for the opening of Man-Made at the Asheville art Museum. 

And so was my family. 

It was SO nice to be able to show my family what I have been up to for the past few years. A little known fact about be is that I dropped out of Architecture school [twice], which for a family of majorly traditional professions seems like one way ticket to bagging groceries. My family has been supportive, but I know a little unsure about what it means to spend all day sewing squares together and not even for a bed. 

To be invited back to Asheville, where I spent lots of high-school and to see my works on the wall and to have my family be around to take pictures with me [hi grandma!] was such a beautiful catharsis. Maybe they are still unsure what my actual job is, but at least they know more about what it is that I make/do. AND I was able to walk then through the pieces on the wall and share with them some of the ideas that went in to them further than the obvious. 

 

Starting a blog from scratch is hard!

I have SO much that I have done over the 6 years I have been a full time quilt-maker and self employed! I have so many adventures and trials [and errors] to share. I had a blog for a few years which was all that, but I decided to start over. to curate stronger, content that may reflect my readers. Who are you? [Who am I?] Maybe I will just got forth with telling you about my projects and let my life be kept to the pages of Facebook and at the tables at parties. [maybe a memoir?] Do please keep me apprise of what projects you want to hear about. There's always plenty. you are the reason I can keep going so I want this to be a dialog not a diatribe. 


Second quilt I made was a wedding present.

It's fun to write this blog because I get to look back at these projects. This was the second quilt I made. I made it while I was home for the summer from Architecture school. I went to the fabric store and bought the fabrics that I thought were super stellar! Of course batik. I bought what I thought was enough fat quarters then set to work assembling them.  [As you can see there weren't nearly enough.] I haven't looked at a picture of this in some time. I love that I used the Half Square triangle for the project. I recall spending a lot of time working on the geometry of this project and wanting to make sure there was a really great secondary pattern within the layout. Looking back now I see a pattern that I am very used to seeing in the vernacular of quilting, but at the time I knew very little about quilting so it was to me a great innovation. 

After making the "whole" top I measured and realized that it was WAYY too small for anyone's bed. apparently when you sew fabric together the seams decrease the size of the overall amount of fabric. hah! so I went back to the store and bought another fat quarter bundle and sewed it around 3 sides of the quilt. 

This was a present for my college roommate as he got married. After making it I spent so much time and money on it I really didn't want to part with it. Which means it's a good gift. If you have an emotional attachment to the present then you are giving some of your self with the object. 

Second quilt

The first Quilt I made.

To start off this blog Seems fitting to start at the very beginning. This was the First quilt I made. Started small. 7 feet tall by 10 feet wide. I started it in art school at the North Carolina School of the Arts. I started from an images I had taken in high school. I was studying Chuck Close and decided that using a grid I could translate an image into fabric. I had these squares of red black and blue fabric that Mom had gotten me years ago that I towed around with the rest of the "I should make something out of this" The process of this first one was quite the learning curve. I started the first few pieces hand sewing them together during my 8am english class. That was quickly abandoned in favor of using the machines that were created to make that process more efficient, a sewing machine. The top probably took me 2 years and then asking around I found out that you could just pay someone to finish it! amazing! The reason it was so large was that the pieces I had already were the size they were and I couldn't make the grid any different and still get the details I got. which is still very abstracted. 

First Quilt

FIRST

Here's to the new and the old! Lets start from scratch. I will be adding a post on all the quilts I have made. [the ones I remember and have photos of anyway...] as well as the things going on in the world of LUKE. Stay tuned!